Organized and taking place on the unceded Coast Salish territories of the L’kwungen and W̱SÁNEĆ nations – also known as victoria.

on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/987052624750234/

Rally To Speak Out To Rich Coleman who is guest speaking at the Our Place Annual General Meeting (AGM).

Rich Coleman 025Z.jpg

Those living on streets homeless, in shelters and those housed under duress have need to express…
THAW Victoria and The Committee to End Homelessness Victoria (CTEHV) are supporting a rally from the streets.

Come for 4pm sharp and help leaflet for

Social Housing Now

Bring Banners if you have one.
Come and hear music from Bobby, Neil and others….

There will be an Open Mic for homeless and housed to speak out!
Come and have fun with the Pinata!

(IF YOU CAN PLEASE DONATE A PAIR OF WOOL SOCKS AND HALLOWEEN CANDY/CHOCOLATE TO PUT IN EACH PAIR, WE ARE GOING TO STUFF PINATA WITH THEM, email us at thawvictoria@gmail.com for drop off spot)

Rich Coleman: Minister of Everything
Is he actually running this BC Government?

Rich Coleman (born c. 1956) is British Columbia’s Deputy Premier, Minister of Energy and Mines, minister responsible for Housing and MLA for the riding of Fort Langley-Aldergrove. He was first elected in 1996 and was re-elected in 2001, 2005, 2009 and 2013.

Rich Coleman: “The man in charge of dealing with housing and homelessness, Coleman, never once publicly called upon Prime Minister Stephen Harper to create a national housing strategy. Never once.” – Charlie Smith

Rich was appointed Deputy Premier and the Minister of Natural Gas Development and Minister Responsible for Housing on June 10, 2013.

On the face of it, Rich Coleman is the top dog in B.C. politics.
The B.C. Liberal deputy premier quarterbacked the party’s fundraising machine leading up to Christy Clark’s stunning upset in the 2013 election.

The former Mountie who represents Fort Langley–Aldergrove routinely gets positive coverage from the Victoria press gallery.

“Q: What specifically do you need to demonstrate to LNG proponents that this is a secure place for those multi-billion dollar projects?
A: We’ve demonstrated it. That’s why they’re here. This file actually started about 2001-2002 when we as a government decided we didn’t want just a summer gas drilling program or a seasonal drilling program in British Columbia. So we adjusted our royalty programs to deal with infrastructure and sent people to drill in non-traditional areas, go deeper, all the things you need to incent people to see if they can find more gas.”

Source: ERRICK PENNER AND SCOTT SIMPSON, VANCOUVER SUN 06.14.2013 (http://www.vancouversun.com/news/rich+coleman+minister+everything/8528577/story.html)

B.C. may still see an LNG plant, but as for that $1 trillion in economic activity and $100 billion prosperity fund the only step left is to call time of death. There’s an upside for the government. The public never bought the hype in the first place.

In the meantime, Coleman has also provided rent supplements to low-income tenants, though critics say these payments are not particularly effective when there’s a shortage of affordable housing stock.

BC has redefined Social Housing, it no longer is 30% of Income.

Words have power for good or bad, Jim Spinelli
Reprinted from “Housing: Discrimination and Inclusion” issue of Visions Journal, 2015, 10 (3), p. 28:
The terms that are casually used to describe housing and its tenants need careful examination and discussion. Many of these terms potentially stigmatize both the housing and the tenants. Among the most loaded terms are “wet housing,” “low-barrier housing,” “people with persistent multiple barriers,” “the mentally ill and drug addicted,” “hard to house” and “street entrenched.” Even terms such as “homelessness” and “homeless person” tend to have negative connotations.

“Market rate rental housing is not ‘social housing’,” the Community Association of New Yaletown asserted in court papers filed on April 2 by lawyer Nathalie Baker.

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