“B.C. Housing has invested $26 million this year for homeless people in Victoria to conform to a court ruling that forbids displacing people living in parks when there are no shelter beds available.”

Does that include this:

“The former Central Care Home at 844 Johnson St., which the province purchased for $11.2 million in June, will have 140 residential units.”

– See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/tent-city-campers-anxious-on-move-as-deadline-looms-1.2313772#sthash.xCIsvyy7.dpuf

What have the homeless gotten exactly?  Temporary shelters is what. Poverty Industry got a BOOST and JOBS and Don Evans helped Rich Coleman to make sure Portland Hotel Society got into town even before Rich got threatened with his head coming off, Choices is TEMPORARY, Central Care Home is looking more and more like a Soft Incarceration situation pretending to be “home” with tenancy agreements…?  I want to be wrong on this but…?

Yesterday afternoon this video went up on THAW Victoria, a call out from a unhoused resident who speaks for quite a few homeless at SIC.

Today, this article below came out.

When unhoused residents came to me suggesting their stories are not getting out, turns out, they are correct.

This is my email response to the Times Columnist author of the article below:

Hello,

I am wondering what inspired you to write this?  Did it have something to do with this call out from a tent city resident I just put up yesterday? Curios for sure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGUnsd42zgQ

Also, why is the Times Columnist only interviewing a housed advocate who does not speak for whole camp and was not appointed by whole camp and not any actual homeless unhoused residents?  They are available for interview but, Times Columnist seems to be censoring them?

All food for thought at a time when we are supposed to be living in a free country with free speech and such.

I am also curios, who said this? ““Best practices have shown that the co-ed model works effectively and allows for couples to stay together, which is a common request.” Sounds like Bernie Pauly?

You say:

“Newly housed people will be required to pay a $375 shelter allowance if they are receiving social assistance of $610 per month, as most of them are.”  How do you know that most of them are?  As far as I can tell, many do NOT get much of anything given they cannot get any rent money if they are homeless, and maybe half are on welfare, they get 75.00 a month.

Poverty Pimping Industry all along have been receiving rent from many of the homeless folks at tent city due to fact their partners or friends could not come in, they call that “soft incarceration”.  That is a whole mess and a shame if you ask me.

In regards to this:

  • The Portland Hotel Society will help residents get their belongings to the facility.

Check out this list PHS gave tent city residents, they were disrespected by number 3 on the list below.  Like they said, no one packs in garbage!

IMG_2274IMG_2275IMG_2276

In ending, a lot of contradictions here that I see:

“In his July ruling, Hinkson said the province had said that following 10 to 12 weeks for remediation of the lawn, it would not seek to forbid overnight sheltering by homeless individuals on courthouse green space.

The courthouse lawn is owned by the province, so campers have not had to pack up each morning as they do in city-owned parks.

At the end of his judgment Hinkson wrote: “As housing becomes available, and by not later than August 8, 2016, the defendants shall remove all structures, tents, shelters, objects and things owned, constructed, maintained, placed or occupied by them which are located at the encampment, and otherwise cease to occupy or reside at the encampment.”

As “housing becomes available”, that is still up for debate as far as people getting housing or yet another shelter?  Seems like just another shelter and, I know that folks on ground want community and home.  Not more workers, no matter how cool they look.

– See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/tent-city-campers-anxious-on-move-as-deadline-looms-1.2313772#sthash.xCIsvyy7.dpuf

Respect,

Kym A. Hines

Committee To End Homelessness Victoria

THE ARTICLE:

Katherine Dedyna / Times Colonist

AUGUST 1, 2016 06:00 AM

(LETS LOOK AT THIS FENCE HERE, IT IS A BYLAW PROBLEM GIVEN WHEEL CHAIRS CANNOT FIT, ITS OBSTRUCTING WAY AND PROVINCE GETS AWAY WITH THIS? City of Victoria?)

Campers anxious to move from tent city to new supportive housing units before an Aug. 8 deadline are still waiting to hear who will move, and when.

Plans to start moving the campers from the Victoria courthouse lawn last week were delayed so that B.C. Housing could complete renovations and security installations at the new residences.

The former Central Care Home at 844 Johnson St., which the province purchased for $11.2 million in June, will have 140 residential units. The facility will be managed by the Vancouver-based Portland Hotel Society.

B.C. Housing told the Times Colonist that the society will “begin moving people into the facility next week. The plan is to move roughly 8-10 people per day.”

It did not specify which day the moves would begin. If the society moves 10 people a day, it will need two weeks to fill the new facility.

All tent city residents are supposed to be accommodated by Aug. 8, the date that the Chief Justice Christopher Hinkson of the B.C. Supreme Court said the province could begin dismantling the encampment at Burdett and Quadra Streets.

Chrissie Brett, an advocate and spokeswoman who sleeps at tent city most nights, said campers still have no sense of a floor plan, what a fully equipped room might look like, or the provisions of the Residential Tenancy Act.

Campers also feel insecurity because of the pending loss of the encampment community they have belonged to since late last year.

“We’ve been told that the first 10 people packed up will be the first 10 people moved in,” Brett said.

B.C. Housing has provided some details about what life will be like in the new supportive housing centre. For instance:

• The facility will be co-ed. “Best practices have shown that the co-ed model works effectively and allows for couples to stay together, which is a common request.”

• The underground parkade will have storage facilities for shopping carts. “We’re not sure of the exact number of parking stalls, but the parkade is being renovated to accommodate storage for residents.”

• Bathrooms in the tenant units will not include bathing facilities, but there will be six individual showers per floor, with attached, lockable change rooms. “Residents will be able to change in private. There are also panic alarms in the shower area. [But] there is no gender separation in the showers.”

• Bike hooks and other storage options are being considered.

• Pets are allowed.

• Newly housed people will be required to pay a $375 shelter allowance if they are receiving social assistance of $610 per month, as most of them are. Staff members from the Ministry of Social Development and Social Innovation will visit the facility to meet with individuals who are not receiving assistance.

• The Portland Hotel Society will help residents get their belongings to the facility.

Tent city is surrounded by eight-foot-high wire fencing. Three large blue dumpsters have been placed on Quadra Street so people can discard things they do not want to take with them.

“Construction fencing was set up around the perimeter of tent city to ensure that only those people who resided at the encampment prior to July 5 will continue to have access to the site until August 8,” the province said.

“Following the Aug. 8 deadline, a remediation process will commence. Details are being negotiated with contractors.”

B.C. Housing has invested $26 million this year for homeless people in Victoria to conform to a court ruling that forbids displacing people living in parks when there are no shelter beds available.

In his July ruling, Hinkson said the province had said that following 10 to 12 weeks for remediation of the lawn, it would not seek to forbid overnight sheltering by homeless individuals on courthouse green space.

The courthouse lawn is owned by the province, so campers have not had to pack up each morning as they do in city-owned parks.

At the end of his judgment Hinkson wrote: “As housing becomes available, and by not later than August 8, 2016, the defendants shall remove all structures, tents, shelters, objects and things owned, constructed, maintained, placed or occupied by them which are located at the encampment, and otherwise cease to occupy or reside at the encampment.”

kdedyna@timescolonist.com

© Copyright Times Colonist

– See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/tent-city-campers-anxious-on-move-as-deadline-looms-1.2313772#sthash.xCIsvyy7.dpuf

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